Ralph Waldo Emerson's Transcendentalism and Indian Thought

Author(s):

Soni Singh

Published in:

HCTL Open International Journal of Technology Innovations and Research (IJTIR), eISSN: 2321-1814

Published on:

02-May-2015

Volume:

Volume 14, April 2015, ISBN:978-1-62951-946-3.

Copyright Information:

© 2015 by the Authors; Licensed by HCTL Open, India.

License Information:

This article is an open-access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Abstract

This paper presents Impact of Indian thought on Ralph Waldo Emerson. Emerson was a famous philosopher, essayist, poet and renowned preacher of America. He represented America in a different mode in mid of the 18th century. For this aim he tried to know value of eternal power and materialistic world. Therefore he read Hindu texts like the Vedas the Upanishads and the Bhagwad Gita, various religious, and German idealism. Emerson believed in progress. He had deep faith in improvement by gradual means. Then even Satan, the rebel, becomes an agent of potential progress. Emerson's works reveal his basic philosophical and mystic ideas. He held that God is moral law, that the world is an emanation from God, that man has divinity within him; that self-reliance is a supreme value, and that the religion of the spirit alone is true. This is an ethical idealism. Indian transcendentalism finds a clear expression in Emerson's writing - Nature, American Scholar, The Divinity School Address, Self Reliance, Rhodora, Bramha and The Over-Soul etc. Here we are told that man and his world formed a project harmony and that one's own institution is more valuable than the voice of tradition or orthodoxy.


Keywords

Ralph Waldo Emerson, Transcendentalism, Indian Thought.

Cite this Article

Soni Singh, Ralph Waldo Emerson's Transcendentalism and Indian Thought, HCTL Open International Journal of Technology Innovations and Research (IJTIR), Volume 14, April 2015, eISSN: 2321-1814, ISBN (Print): 978-1-62951-946-3.

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